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Researchers Study Pollutants Turning Taj Mahal Yellow

A new study has identified the pollutants that are causing the marble of India’s iconic Taj Mahal to turn yellow. The discoloration of the white marble has long been a concern, but the latest study could help in drawing up more targeted measures to protect the 360-year-old famed monument of love.
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The Taj Mahal attracts millions of visitors each year. Researchers have determined how particulates in the air are discoloring the landmark.
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The Taj Mahal attracts millions of visitors each year. Researchers have determined how particulates in the air are discoloring the landmark.

Air sampling equipment located in this section of the Taj Mahal complex was used to determine what was causing discoloration of the landmark structure.
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Air sampling equipment located in this section of the Taj Mahal complex was used to determine what was causing discoloration of the landmark structure.

Gray particles in this air filter are particulates captured by air sampling equipment at the Taj Mahal complex.
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Gray particles in this air filter are particulates captured by air sampling equipment at the Taj Mahal complex.

A worker cleans a portion of the Taj Mahal complex. Marble on the right shows brownish discoloration caused by particles of carbon, and dust.
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A worker cleans a portion of the Taj Mahal complex. Marble on the right shows brownish discoloration caused by particles of carbon, and dust.

This close-up image shows the contrast between cleaned and discolored marble in the Taj Mahal complex. New research shows that the brownish discoloration is caused by particles of carbon, and dust.
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This close-up image shows the contrast between cleaned and discolored marble in the Taj Mahal complex. New research shows that the brownish discoloration is caused by particles of carbon, and dust.

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