Human Rights

One Year After Borei Keila Eviction, ‘No Solution’

In this photo taken on Friday, May 4, 2012, Cambodian protesters from Boueng Kak lake march with a banner displaying the thumb prints of fellow land owners who have been evicted from their homes, as they demand compensation, in Phnom Penh, file photo. In this photo taken on Friday, May 4, 2012, Cambodian protesters from Boueng Kak lake march with a banner displaying the thumb prints of fellow land owners who have been evicted from their homes, as they demand compensation, in Phnom Penh, file photo.
x
In this photo taken on Friday, May 4, 2012, Cambodian protesters from Boueng Kak lake march with a banner displaying the thumb prints of fellow land owners who have been evicted from their homes, as they demand compensation, in Phnom Penh, file photo.
In this photo taken on Friday, May 4, 2012, Cambodian protesters from Boueng Kak lake march with a banner displaying the thumb prints of fellow land owners who have been evicted from their homes, as they demand compensation, in Phnom Penh, file photo.
Say MonyVOA Khmer
PHNOM PENH - It has been one year since the residents of the impoverished Phnom Penh neighborhood of Borei Keila were forcibly evicted and relocated to desolate camps outside the capital.

Evictees marked the day Thursday with blessings from Buddhist monks and hopes they would be compensated by the development company, Phanimex.

Hundreds of families were evicted from the neighborhood to make way for a residential development project, and former residents say Phanimex failed to provide the housing it had promised in exchange for the land.

Over the last year, families that were evicted from the neighborhood have lived in tents outside the city, far from businesses, health care, schools and clean water.

“Until now, there has been no solution for us,” Chhay Kim Horn, a representative of villagers who refused to move out of their homes, told VOA Khmer Thursday, as monks chanted blessings to mark the anniversary of the Jan. 3, 2012, eviction. “We’ve been living in misery.”

One Year After Borei Keila Eviction, ‘No Solution’i
X
03 January 2013
It has been exactly one year since the residents of the impoverished Phnom Penh neighborhood of Borei Keila were forcibly evicted and relocated to desolate camps outside the capital. Evictees marked the day Thursday with blessings from Buddhist monks and hopes they will be compensated by the development company. Hundreds of families were evicted from the neighborhood to make way for a residential development project, and former residents say the company, Phanimex, failed to provide the housing it had promised in exchange for the land. (Say Mony, Phnom Penh)

Evictees say Phanimex promised to build 10 apartment buildings, enough to house the people who would be removed by their development project, but the company only built eight. Phanimex President Suy Sophan could not be reached for comment Thursday, but the company has said in the past it constructed enough housing for legitimate evictees.

Either way, a year ago on Jan. 3, houses in the Borei Keila neighborhood were bulldozed, and about 300 families were left homeless. They were trucked to two separate relocation sites: Tuol Sambor, on the outskirts of the capital, and Phnom Bath, 50 kilometers outside the city.

“I joined others today because it is a day of destruction that I will never forget for the rest of my life,” said Tan Nara, who was arrested last year while protesting the forced eviction.

Tim Sakmony, another former resident, who was released from prison just last week after allegedly making false claims against the company president, said the evictees will continue to push for their homes, no matter how long it takes.

“I will still demand them,” Tim Sakmony said. “I’m not afraid.”
Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Demonstrators Call on Government To Fulfill Principles of Peace Accordsi
X
24 October 2014
Hundreds of activists demonstrated in Phnom Penh on Thursday, gathering to protest the government’s failure to fulfill the promises of the Paris Peace Accords, which were signed in 1991 and brought liberal democracy and a constitution to a country that had been shattered by war. The demonstrators submitted a petition to the US and other embassies, calling for international pressure on the Cambodian government to follow the accords. (Kong Sothanarith, Phnom Penh)

English with Mani & Mori

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Face the Music (Movie: Yes Man)i
X
20 October 2014
You can say, "You lied, and lied, but this time you got caught. It's time you 'face the music'. It's time you confess and tell the truth." What does it mean? Watch here. For more videos - go to youtube.com/KhmerSpecialEnglish. To contact Mani & Mori - write to them at maniandmori@gmail.com.
Video

Video Face the Music (Movie: Yes Man)

You can say, "You lied, and lied, but this time you got caught. It's time you 'face the music'. It's time you confess and tell the truth." What does it mean? Watch here. For more videos - go to youtube.com/KhmerSpecialEnglish. To contact Mani & Mori - write to them at maniandmori@gmail.com.
Video

Video Hit the Nail on the Head (Movie: Inside Job)

You can say, "The professor 'hit the nail on the head' when she said, that we cannot demand respect, respect must be earned and not given freely." What does it mean? Watch here. For more videos - go to www.youtube.com/KhmerSpecialEnglish or www.khmer.voanews.com/maniandmori. To contact Mani & Mori
Video

Video Speak of the Devil (Movie: Easy A)

You can say, "Speaking of the devil, there she is! Hey, we were just talking about you a moment ago." What does it mean? Watch here. For more videos - go to youtube.com/KhmerSpecialEnglish. To contact Mani & Mori - write to them at maniandmori@gmail.com.
Video

Video Rock the Boat (Movie: 500 Days of Summer)

You can say, "Things are going really well between the two of you - he's happy and you're happy, so why 'rock the boat'?" What does it mean? Watch here. For more videos - go to www.youtube.com/KhmerSpecialEnglish. To contact Mani & Mori - write to them at maniandmori@gmail.com.
See more >>>