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Trump: All Options on the Table After N. Korea Missile Launch

  • Steve Herman
  • VOA News

FILE - President Donald Trump, right, speaks during a meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the G20 Summit, July 8, 2017, in Hamburg, Germany.

President Donald Trump says "all options are on the table" following the latest North Korean missile launch.

The missile, which flew high over the northern region of U.S. ally Japan early Tuesday Asia time, was likely an intermediate range ballistic missile, according to American officials.

North Korea "has signaled its contempt for its neighbors, for all members of the United Nations, and for minimum standards of acceptable international behavior," Trump said in a statement released by the White House.

"All options are on the table," the presidential statement concluded.

When asked by VOA on Tuesday morning what specifically he planned to do about North Korea, the president replied, "We'll see, we'll see", without elaborating before boarding the Marine One helicopter on the South Lawn.

Speaking hours ahead of an emergency meeting of the U.N. Security Council, U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley said diplomats “are going to talk about what else is left to do to North Korea.”

Haley said that it is unacceptable that Pyongyang has “violated every single U.N. Security Council resolution that we had and so I think something serious has to happen.”

WATCH: Haley on North Korea


Haley expressed hope “that China and Russia continues to work with us like they have in the past on North Korea, but I think enough is enough.”

Trump spoke on the phone with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe following the launch. The leaders, according to the White House, agreed North Korea poses a "grave and growing direct threat" to both countries.

A man watches a TV screen showing a file footage of North Korea's missile launch, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Aug. 29, 2017.
A man watches a TV screen showing a file footage of North Korea's missile launch, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Aug. 29, 2017.


Without advance notice North Korea launched the missile from near Pyongyang’s international airport.

Japan’s government says it passed high above Hokkaido about 10 minutes after launch, split into three pieces and splashed into the Pacific Ocean, east of the northern main Japanese island of Hokkaido, according to Japan’s government.

In all, the missile flew an estimated 2,700 kilometers and was airborne for about 14 minutes, reaching a maximum altitude of 550 kilometers, according Japan’s Ministry of Defense.

An August 25 launch of three short-range ballistic missiles ended a month-long hiatus in such tests, which U.S. officials interpreted as “restraint,” prompting Trump last week to say that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un was “starting to respect us.”

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