Cambodia

Youth Showing More Political Engagement as Election Approaches

A supporter, center, of the newly merged Cambodia National Rescue Party, holds an iPad during an election campaign in Koh Kra-bey on the outskirts of Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Wednesday, July 3, 2013. Cambodia's political parties on June 27, 2013 kicked off the official campaign period for the July 28 general election, which is virtually certain to see Prime Minister Hun Sen, Asia's longest-serving leader, extend his 28 years in power. (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)A supporter, center, of the newly merged Cambodia National Rescue Party, holds an iPad during an election campaign in Koh Kra-bey on the outskirts of Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Wednesday, July 3, 2013. Cambodia's political parties on June 27, 2013 kicked off the official campaign period for the July 28 general election, which is virtually certain to see Prime Minister Hun Sen, Asia's longest-serving leader, extend his 28 years in power. (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)
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A supporter, center, of the newly merged Cambodia National Rescue Party, holds an iPad during an election campaign in Koh Kra-bey on the outskirts of Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Wednesday, July 3, 2013. Cambodia's political parties on June 27, 2013 kicked off the official campaign period for the July 28 general election, which is virtually certain to see Prime Minister Hun Sen, Asia's longest-serving leader, extend his 28 years in power. (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)
A supporter, center, of the newly merged Cambodia National Rescue Party, holds an iPad during an election campaign in Koh Kra-bey on the outskirts of Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Wednesday, July 3, 2013. Cambodia's political parties on June 27, 2013 kicked off the official campaign period for the July 28 general election, which is virtually certain to see Prime Minister Hun Sen, Asia's longest-serving leader, extend his 28 years in power. (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)
Khoun ThearaVOA Khmer
PHNOM PENH - In the past few months, an unprecedented number of Cambodians under the age of 30 have begun participating in the political process, holding rallies, volunteering and posting on social media. This could lead to positive social change, observers say. But it remains to be seen how their engagement will play out on Election Day.

Around 3.5 million of 9.5 million registered voters are between the ages of 18 and 30, according to the National Election Committee. Of those, some 1.5 million are first-time voters.

That may seem like a lot. But no one really knows how many of them will turn out to vote. Only about half of those registered in that age group took part in commune elections last year. Some were too far from their homes, some did not have enough information, and some simply were not interested.

Experts say that could change this year., pointing to a high number of volunteers as election monitors as one indicator.

About 70 percent of the 10,000 election observers for the Committee for Free and Fair Elections are under 30.

“I volunteered as an observer because I want to see a free and fair election and report any irregularities or fraud during the upcoming election,” said Leng Chhanvy, 26, who is based in Kampong Thom province.

Another volunteer, Ouk Pao, 23, said he wanted to encourage young people in his community to vote, by helping the Youth Chamber of Cambodia. He’s one of 720 youths in nine provinces volunteering to help get out the vote.

“The reason I decided to volunteer in this program is that I think youth are a driving force for positive change in society,” he said. “So I have collaborated with a few other youths in my community to educate people in various communities about the importance of the election and the necessary documents needed. After our explanations, they appeared to be a lot more active in election.”

Still, where some volunteers are engaged in the election, others interviewed by VOA Khmer said they didn’t feel the need to volunteer, though most said they would vote.

“I have not participated in any election activities so far, but I have targeted a party to vote for, so I will go to vote for that party,” Kim Seng, a 25-year-old food vendor in Phnom Penh, told VOA Khmer.

Voters like Kim Seng will have representatives from eight different parties to choose from when they go to the polls on July 28.

Cheang Sokha, executive director of the Youth Resource Development Council, said that Election Day will see a more dedicated generation, one whose members are increasingly passing election information between one another.

“They tend to share it with their circles of friends or families,” he said. “Also, they have actively participated in political campaigns for all political parties, which is quite different from previous mandates.”

Social media has helped spread some information, he said, but he noted that there are still many of the younger generation living in rural areas, or in poverty, who lack resources and education.

That means lower participation, said Koul Panha, head of the Committee for Free and Fair Elections. For these youth, registering is difficult and election information is scant, he said.

Still Cheang Sokha remains confident that a greater voter turnout will take place this year.
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Protesters Clash With Police Outside Premier’s Homei
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18 August 2014
Hundreds of housing rights protesters and evictees clashed with security forces outside Phnom Penh on Monday, leaving at least nine people with minor injuries. The clash was one of the first since major violence over Freedom Park in the capital in July. Protesters gathered outside the National Assembly Monday morning, hoping to deliver petitions of grievances, but when no one came out to accept the petitions, they decided to march on the suburban home of Prime Minister Hun Sen, in Kratie province, just outside the capital. There, they clashed with security personnel. VOA's Khmer Suy Heimkhemra reports from Phnom Penh.

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