Cambodia

Villagers Say Crops Being Bulldozed to Make Way for Soldiers’ Land

Preah Vihear provincial authorities recently announced they needed around 5,500 hectare in “social land concessions” to provide to retired government soldiers.

Cambodian soldiers carry their weapons near Preah Vihear temple along the border with Thailand, file photo.Cambodian soldiers carry their weapons near Preah Vihear temple along the border with Thailand, file photo.
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Cambodian soldiers carry their weapons near Preah Vihear temple along the border with Thailand, file photo.
Cambodian soldiers carry their weapons near Preah Vihear temple along the border with Thailand, file photo.
Heng ReaksmeyVOA Khmer
PHNOM PENH - Representatives from some 370 families arrived at the Phnom Penh administration building of Prime Minister Hun Sen on Monday, calling on him to intervene in a land dispute in their home province of Preah Vihear.

Leaders of the group said they are being ousted from their homes along National Road 64 to make room for government land for retired soldiers.

Chea Yean, 60, from Sroryong village, near the border with Siem Reap province, said authorities had already begun to bulldoze the land, leveling villagers’ crops.

Hun Sen has designated a youth corps to measure land in some disputes, and Chea Yean said he wanted their help in settling the dispute.

Preah Vihear provincial authorities recently announced they needed around 5,500 hectare in “social land concessions” to provide to retired government soldiers.

Sous Yara, an undersecretary of state for the Cabinet Ministry, said officials will go to the area to investigate on Thursday.
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