Tuesday, 16 September 2014

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Researcher Joins Genocide Experts in Austrian Conference

Human sculls are displayed in the stupa of Choeung Ek, a former Khmer Rouge "killing field" dotted with mass graves about nine miles (15 kilometers) south of Phnom Penh.
Human sculls are displayed in the stupa of Choeung Ek, a former Khmer Rouge "killing field" dotted with mass graves about nine miles (15 kilometers) south of Phnom Penh.
Men KimsengVOA Khmer

Genocide experts from around the world are meeting in Austria this week to discuss ways to better educate the public and prevent atrocity crimes in the future.

The symposium, called “Learning from the Past: Global Perspectives on Holocaust Education,” ends Monday.

Organizers say that teaching the history of the Holocaust can prevent racism, ethnic conflict and genocide.

Ser Sayana, a researcher for the Documentation Center of Cambodia who is attending the symposium, told VOA Khmer Friday that Cambodia has a lot of input to offer from its own experiences.

This is particularly true with its research into Khmer Rouge atrocities and efforts to incorporate that history into school curriculum, she said.

Cambodians still have many questions about the Khmer Rouge and “why Khmer killed Khmer,” she said.

“We have to educate our younger generation as to why such crimes took place,” she said.

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Cambodian American Hip Hop Artist Raps About Personal Strugglesi
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English with Mani & Mori

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