Wednesday, 28 January 2015

Cambodia

Opposition Faces Disinformation Campaign

The letter, which began circulation on Sunday, states that Sam Rainsy does not want to lead a new party with Human Rights Party President Kem Sokha.

The conjoined party will be called the Cambodian National Rescue Party and will include officials from the Sam Rainsy and Human Rights parties.The conjoined party will be called the Cambodian National Rescue Party and will include officials from the Sam Rainsy and Human Rights parties.
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The conjoined party will be called the Cambodian National Rescue Party and will include officials from the Sam Rainsy and Human Rights parties.
The conjoined party will be called the Cambodian National Rescue Party and will include officials from the Sam Rainsy and Human Rights parties.
Sok KhemaraVOA Khmer
WASHINGTON DC - Opposition officials say they are battling a disinformation campaign after a letter began circulating this weekend claiming divisions in their newly formed coalition.

Party president Sam Rainsy told VOA Khmer by phone from France Monday a letter circulated electronically through Cambodia was a "divisive strategy" by opponents of the party.

The letter, which began circulation by e-mail and social media on Sunday, states that Sam Rainsy does not want to lead a new party with Human Rights Party President Kem Sokha, because Sam Rainsy will not be able to lead in national elections next year.

Sam Rainsy is in exile, having been found guilty of a number of charges in Cambodia he claims are politically motivated. On Monday, he denied the message of the letter and said he believes he'll find a political solution to return for 2013 elections.

The fabricated letter "marks a critical fear of my political rivals, who do not want me and Mr. Kem Sokha to unify," he said.

"It is a dividing strategy to break the new party coalition," Kem Sokha said, adding that the parties would work together to clear up the public confusion caused by the letter.
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