Cambodia

Mam Sonando Developing Dental Complications in Jail

Mam Sonando, 72, has been in prison for more than six months, on charges he helped foment a secessionist movement in Kratie province last year.Mam Sonando, 72, has been in prison for more than six months, on charges he helped foment a secessionist movement in Kratie province last year.
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Mam Sonando, 72, has been in prison for more than six months, on charges he helped foment a secessionist movement in Kratie province last year.
Mam Sonando, 72, has been in prison for more than six months, on charges he helped foment a secessionist movement in Kratie province last year.
Heng ReaksmeyVOA Khmer
PHNOM PENH - Jailed Beehive Radio owner Mam Sonando has a toothache, and family are urging prison officials to let him have it treated on the outside before it develops complications.

Mam Sonando, 72, has been in prison for more than six months, on charges he helped foment a secessionist movement in Kratie province last year. The Court of Appeals in December denied his request to be released under house arrest, saying his dual citizenship with France made him a flight risk.

Beehive Radio broadcasts programming for the Voice of America, Radio Free Asia and others, and local and international rights groups have said Mam Sonando was imprisoned after criticizing Prime Minister Hun Sen.

His wife, Din Phannara, told VOA Khmer Friday that Prey Sar prison lacks adequate facilities for dental work, but prison officials have not responded to a request for treatment outside. She said she is worried a toothache will develop into swelling and other complications.

Srun Leang, chief of Prey Sar prison, confirmed receipt of the request, but he said he was waiting for a response from the Ministry of Interior’s prison department.
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