Khmer Rouge

Khmer Rouge Victim Threatens Lawsuit Against Opposition Official

Cambodian protesters hold a banner, top, during a rally demanding Kem Sokha, vice president of Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP), to apologize in public, at Democracy Square, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Sunday, June 9, 2013. Cambodia's main opposition party denounced the large demonstration in the capital Sunday, which they said was staged by supporters of Prime Minister Hun Sen to intimidate rivals ahead of July elections. Banners, from left bottom, read " Kem Sokha is more cowardly than Duch," “ In our life we have never forgotten the torturers made by the teams of Po Pot,” “Kem Sokha has to take responsibility before the rule of law,” and “Kem Sokha is fighting against the Khmer Rouge Trial.” (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)Cambodian protesters hold a banner, top, during a rally demanding Kem Sokha, vice president of Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP), to apologize in public, at Democracy Square, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Sunday, June 9, 2013. Cambodia's main opposition party denounced the large demonstration in the capital Sunday, which they said was staged by supporters of Prime Minister Hun Sen to intimidate rivals ahead of July elections. Banners, from left bottom, read " Kem Sokha is more cowardly than Duch," “ In our life we have never forgotten the torturers made by the teams of Po Pot,” “Kem Sokha has to take responsibility before the rule of law,” and “Kem Sokha is fighting against the Khmer Rouge Trial.” (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)
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Cambodian protesters hold a banner, top, during a rally demanding Kem Sokha, vice president of Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP), to apologize in public, at Democracy Square, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Sunday, June 9, 2013. Cambodia's main opposition party denounced the large demonstration in the capital Sunday, which they said was staged by supporters of Prime Minister Hun Sen to intimidate rivals ahead of July elections. Banners, from left bottom, read " Kem Sokha is more cowardly than Duch," “ In our life we have never forgotten the torturers made by the teams of Po Pot,” “Kem Sokha has to take responsibility before the rule of law,” and “Kem Sokha is fighting against the Khmer Rouge Trial.” (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)
Cambodian protesters hold a banner, top, during a rally demanding Kem Sokha, vice president of Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP), to apologize in public, at Democracy Square, in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Sunday, June 9, 2013. Cambodia's main opposition party denounced the large demonstration in the capital Sunday, which they said was staged by supporters of Prime Minister Hun Sen to intimidate rivals ahead of July elections. Banners, from left bottom, read " Kem Sokha is more cowardly than Duch," “ In our life we have never forgotten the torturers made by the teams of Po Pot,” “Kem Sokha has to take responsibility before the rule of law,” and “Kem Sokha is fighting against the Khmer Rouge Trial.” (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)
Kong Sothanarith, Suy HeimkhemraVOA Khmer
PHNOM PENH - Pressure continues for a senior opposition party official to apologize for alleged remarks that has upset victims of the Khmer Rouge.

Chhum Mey, an outspoken survivor of the regime’s infamous Tuol Sleng prison, told VOA Khmer Tuesday that he intends to sue Kem Sokha, vice president of the Cambodia National Rescue Party, unless an apology is forthcoming for the latter’s alleged claims that the crimes of the prison were staged by Vietnamese forces after they ousted the Khmer Rouge.

“Now I will wait for any response from Kem Sokha,” Chhum Mey said.

Kem Sokha has denied making such claims and refused to apologize, despite a demonstration held in capital on Sunday. Rescue Party spokesman Yem Bonnarith said Kem Sokha too is a victim of the Khmer Rouge.

Chhum Mey’s threat appears related to a new law hastily passed by the National Assembly last week that criminalizes denials of Khmer Rouge atrocities.

Critics say the law was passed by ruling party officials after allegations were made against Kem Sokha, in an effort to discredit the opposition ahead of July’s national elections, a claim ruling party officials deny.

However, Sok Sam Oeun, executive director of the Cambodian Defenders Project, a legal organization, said there would be no punishment under that law because it was passed after his alleged remarks. “That law is unnecessary for now,” he added.

Other legal experts said this week the law appeared to have been ordered by Prime Minister Hun Sen ahead of the July elections.

The law was passed by the National Assembly, which is dominated by the ruling Cambodian People’s Party, following the expulsion of 27 opposition lawmakers who have joined the Rescue Party.

Ou Virak, head of the Cambodian Center for Human Rights, said the law was drafted “to target Kem Sokha and to divert voter attention away from national issues, like deforestation, corruption, infrastructure and land grabs.”

Seven years ago, Hun Sen’s main political opponent, Prince Norodom Ranarridh, was similarly targeted under a law that criminalized polygamy, Ou Virak said.

Son Chhay, an opposition lawmaker, called the legislation “unlawful.”
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Yearlong Political Deadlock Endsi
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22 July 2014
Cambodia’s political deadlock has ended. For nearly a year, the opposition Cambodia National Rescue Party has refused to join the government, calling for electoral reforms in a system it says was deeply flawed. Following nearly five hours of meetings between top opposition officials and Prime Minister Hun Sen, that deadlock has ended. The two sides finally reached agreement on a formula for selecting the National Election Committee, which the Rescue Party has said was biased toward the ruling Cambodian People’s Party. Hun Sen and Rescue Party President Sam Rainsy emerged from talks Tuesday smiling and shaking hands. “Victory,” Hun Sen told reporters after the meeting. “You can all applaud.” (Heng Reaksmey, Phnom Penh)

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