Khmer Rouge

Khmer Rouge Tribunal Victims Unit To Hold Seminar

Survivors from Khmer Rouge's main prison and regime victims gather together to greet the officials of war crime tribunal in a former Khmer Rouge S-21 prison, known as Tuol Sleng, now a genocide museum, in Phnom Penh, file photo.Survivors from Khmer Rouge's main prison and regime victims gather together to greet the officials of war crime tribunal in a former Khmer Rouge S-21 prison, known as Tuol Sleng, now a genocide museum, in Phnom Penh, file photo.
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Survivors from Khmer Rouge's main prison and regime victims gather together to greet the officials of war crime tribunal in a former Khmer Rouge S-21 prison, known as Tuol Sleng, now a genocide museum, in Phnom Penh, file photo.
Survivors from Khmer Rouge's main prison and regime victims gather together to greet the officials of war crime tribunal in a former Khmer Rouge S-21 prison, known as Tuol Sleng, now a genocide museum, in Phnom Penh, file photo.
Kong SothanarithVOA Khmer
The victims support section of the UN-backed Khmer Rouge tribunal will hold a seminar next week to help survivors and lawyers prepare for the final phase of a trial against two former regime leaders.
 
The second phase of an atrocity crimes trial against Nuon Chea, the regime’s ideologue, and Khieu Samphan, its head of state, is expected at the end of the year.
 
The upcoming phase will cover crimes that include genocide and will focus on security centers, work cooperatives, purges, forced marriage and crimes against ethnic minorities such as the Muslim Cham and Vietnamese.
 
Officials at the Victims Support Section said in a statement Wednesday that they want to hear from lawyers and victims, as well as donors, as they discuss the upcoming trial phase.
 
Tribunal spokesman Neth Pheaktra said the court wants to hear from civil party parties, particularly about their needs for reparation.
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