Cambodia

Injured American Deminers Now in Bangkok

According to the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, 156 countries have signed an international mine ban and 108 have signed a convention against cluster munitions.According to the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, 156 countries have signed an international mine ban and 108 have signed a convention against cluster munitions.
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According to the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, 156 countries have signed an international mine ban and 108 have signed a convention against cluster munitions.
According to the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, 156 countries have signed an international mine ban and 108 have signed a convention against cluster munitions.
Heng ReaksmeyVOA Khmer
PHNOM PENH - All four Americans who were injured in a demining incident in Cambodia on Tuesday have been evacuated to Bangkok, a US Embassy official said.

The four men, identified by the US Embassy as Phillip McGill, Matthew Schaefer, David Crouse, and Len Austin, had been conducting demining training for two days, when a rocket shell they were working with exploded at the Cambodian Mine Action Center in Kampong Chhnang province.

There was no further word on their condition.

Heng Ratana, head of the center, said an investigation is ongoing. More details will follow the conclusion of the investigation, he said.

US Embassy spokesman John Simmons confirmed the identities of the men and said they had been evacuated to Bangkok. The US is also awaiting the results of an investigation, he said.

Terry Murphree, acting deputy chief of mission, took a moment after a ceremony in Phnom Penh Thursday to thank the men for their service. “It is through the work of these soldiers, and many others like them, who are willing to do such hard and dangerous work far from home, that the lives of people worldwide can be improved,” Murphree said.
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English with Mani & Mori

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