Khmer Rouge

Holocaust Museum Delegation Prepares for Cambodia Trip

The delegation will be examining the UN-backed atrocity crimes tribunal, visiting the “killing fields” of the country, and learning what challenges the country still faces in coming to terms with its past.

Human sculls are displayed in the stupa of Choeung Ek, a former Khmer Rouge "killing field" dotted with mass graves about nine miles (15 kilometers) south of Phnom Penh, file photo. Human sculls are displayed in the stupa of Choeung Ek, a former Khmer Rouge "killing field" dotted with mass graves about nine miles (15 kilometers) south of Phnom Penh, file photo.
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Human sculls are displayed in the stupa of Choeung Ek, a former Khmer Rouge "killing field" dotted with mass graves about nine miles (15 kilometers) south of Phnom Penh, file photo.
Human sculls are displayed in the stupa of Choeung Ek, a former Khmer Rouge "killing field" dotted with mass graves about nine miles (15 kilometers) south of Phnom Penh, file photo.
Reasey PochVOA Khmer
[Editor’s note: Michael Abramowitz, director of the Genocide Prevention Program at the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, will lead a delegation to Cambodia this week. The delegation will be examining the UN-backed atrocity crimes tribunal, visiting the “killing fields” of the country, and learning what challenges the country still faces in coming to terms with its past. The delegation will include Michael Chertoff, former secretary of Homeland Security, and other board members, Abramowitz told VOA Khmer in an interview.]

Are there any planned meetings with officials?

Well, we are definitely going to spend a day visiting memorial sites, Tuol Sleng, etc. We are going to spend a day at the court, and we have a meeting with the prosecutor, some of the judges and some of the lawyers involved in the court, and we will have some meetings with Cambodian senior officials. We have not ironed that out, so I don’t want to say yet. But we have asked for some meetings with senior officials in the Cambodian government. We also expect to meet with Cambodian civil society as well. You know, we’re interested in meeting with people involved in reconciliation, human rights, etc.

Do you have any plans to meet with the victims of the Khmer Rouge?

Absolutely. That was implied in my statement. Definitely, we have arranged to meet with some of the victims who have been testifying in court, in the trial No. 1 with Duch. And we also plan to meet with other victims. We also have been working with the Documentation Center of Cambodia’s Youk Chhang, who has been helping arrange some of our meetings, too.

Currently, are there any displays or exhibits in the Holocaust Museum in Washington about the Khmer Rouge?

There is not right now but we plan to change that. That’s one of the reasons for the trip. That we would like to have a display in the museum about the case and about what happened in Cambodia between 1975 and 1979. So we have some material in the museum right now, about, for instance, the Rwandan genocide. And also about Bosnia, but we would like to add to that material about the Cambodian case, because we think that’s one of the most important cases and most significant cases of mass killings since the Holocaust, and we want to be able to educate our visitors about what happened there.

How is the museum funded?

The museum is a public-private partnership. The museum is actually an independent agency of the federal government. About half of our money comes from the federal government and about half comes from private donations.

Is there anything else that you would like to add that I have not asked?

I do think that this is a very significant trip for the museum. We have done previous trips to memorial sites in Europe where the Holocaust happened, to concentration camps and other sites in Europe. But we have never done a trip like this to Asia or really even for another case. So this is a very significant trip for the museum, and we are very much looking forward to it and we really want to learn as much as we can about the terrible events that happened in Cambodia 35 years ago.
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US Seeking Stronger Ties as Cambodia’s Political Reforms Move Forward​i
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28 August 2014
A senior US diplomat says the country is looking to strengthen ties with Cambodia, now that the opposition has ended a boycott of the National Assembly. “We want to have a good relationship with the nation of Cambodia, the people of Cambodia,” Scot Marciel, the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for East Asia and Pacific Bureau, told VOA Khmer in an exclusive interview. “We have an interest in a Cambodia that is successful, democratic, more prosperous, enjoying good health, and good education. Again, this is mostly up to the Cambodian people but we want to be supportive because it’s in our interest for Cambodia to be successful.” The US has made a recent diplomatic resurgence in Asia, where China’s influence continues to grow.​ Marciel, who is visiting the country, said Wednesday that Cambodia’s moves toward electoral reforms are encouraging. “I think what we’re looking to see, like the Cambodian people, the people here have made it clear that they would like to see some more reforms some progress on some of the challenges that the Cambodia faces, and we feel the same way,” he said. “We are hopeful that the government and the parliament as it is now seated can move ahead on some of the reforms that people here have called for. We think that would be a positive step.” (Sok Khemara, Washington)

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