Cambodia

Corruption Campaign Will Require Clear Fees for Services, Advocate Says

Many Cambodians pay bribes for administrative paperwork, such as marriage or birth certificates, as well as other public services. If they fail to pay, the process can be delayed for months or years.Many Cambodians pay bribes for administrative paperwork, such as marriage or birth certificates, as well as other public services. If they fail to pay, the process can be delayed for months or years.
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Many Cambodians pay bribes for administrative paperwork, such as marriage or birth certificates, as well as other public services. If they fail to pay, the process can be delayed for months or years.
Many Cambodians pay bribes for administrative paperwork, such as marriage or birth certificates, as well as other public services. If they fail to pay, the process can be delayed for months or years.
VOA Khmer
WASHINGTON DC - Cambodia must do more to put clear “price tags” on services it intends to charge people for government services and set clear timelines for delivery of those services, if it is to advance its fight against corruption, a leading transparency advocate says.

San Chey, Cambodia representative for the Affiliated Network for Social Accountability in East Asia and the Pacific, told “Hello VOA” on Monday that people are tired of paying bribes that are made easy because officials have no set prices for some services and no deadlines.

This allows them to extort more money from people who need something done quickly, or at all. The government has said it plans to make 2013 a year in which it tackles corruption—ahead of a elections to be held in July. San Chey called the campaign “a forward development.” However, he said, “it remains to be seen how effective it is.”

“People are not happy to pay bribes,” San Chey said. “But due to the absence of price tags and clear timelines for the delivery of services, they end up paying officials. If there are those things, officials have no more excuses to extort money.”

Many Cambodians pay bribes for administrative paperwork, such as marriage or birth certificates, as well as other public services. If they fail to pay, the process can be delayed for months or years.

A new anti-corruption law came into effect in 2011, and this has made people “eager to report more on corruption,” San Chey said. However, there are loopholes in the law, and definitions of corruption are unclear, which makes it hard to hold officials accountable, he said. And simply imprisoning them won’t do.

“If the government arrests and put them all in prison, there would have to be three or four additional prisons just to put them all in,” he said.
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US Seeking Stronger Ties as Cambodia’s Political Reforms Move Forward​i
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28 August 2014
A senior US diplomat says the country is looking to strengthen ties with Cambodia, now that the opposition has ended a boycott of the National Assembly. “We want to have a good relationship with the nation of Cambodia, the people of Cambodia,” Scot Marciel, the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for East Asia and Pacific Bureau, told VOA Khmer in an exclusive interview. “We have an interest in a Cambodia that is successful, democratic, more prosperous, enjoying good health, and good education. Again, this is mostly up to the Cambodian people but we want to be supportive because it’s in our interest for Cambodia to be successful.” The US has made a recent diplomatic resurgence in Asia, where China’s influence continues to grow.​ Marciel, who is visiting the country, said Wednesday that Cambodia’s moves toward electoral reforms are encouraging. “I think what we’re looking to see, like the Cambodian people, the people here have made it clear that they would like to see some more reforms some progress on some of the challenges that the Cambodia faces, and we feel the same way,” he said. “We are hopeful that the government and the parliament as it is now seated can move ahead on some of the reforms that people here have called for. We think that would be a positive step.” (Sok Khemara, Washington)

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Doze Off (Movie: Hairspray)i
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25 August 2014
You can say, "I don't know why, but every time I eat 'prahok' (Cambodian anchovy) I find myself 'dozing off' all the time." What does it mean? Watch here. For more videos - go to facebook.com/voakhmer or www.youtube.com/KhmerSpecialEnglish. To contact Mani & Mori - write to them at maniandmori@gmail.com.
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You can say, "I don't know why, but every time I eat 'prahok' (Cambodian anchovy) I find myself 'dozing off' all the time." What does it mean? Watch here. For more videos - go to facebook.com/voakhmer or youtube.com/KhmerSpecialEnglish. To contact Mani & Mori - write to them at maniandmori@gmail.
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