Cambodia

Cambodian Olympians Vow To Do Their Best

This year’s six athletes mark the largest showing since 1996.

Davin Sorn, who started taekwondo when she was 15 years old, said for the first two years she kept losing.Davin Sorn, who started taekwondo when she was 15 years old, said for the first two years she kept losing.
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Davin Sorn, who started taekwondo when she was 15 years old, said for the first two years she kept losing.
Davin Sorn, who started taekwondo when she was 15 years old, said for the first two years she kept losing.
Poch ReaseyVOA Khmer
WASHINGTON DC - The six Cambodian athletes competing in the Summer Games this year in London say they realize the Olympics are the most competitive in the world, but they promised to do their best in their events.

Cambodians are competing in judo, swimming, taekwondo and athletics.

In a Skype interview with VOA Khmer, Davin Sorn, who started taekwondo when she was 15 years old, said for the first two years she kept losing.

“But then I saw a slogan at the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports that reminds athletes that losing is a stage toward winning,” she said. “So I worked hard to win for myself, as well as for my country.”

Cambodia first joined the Olympics in 1956, putting two equestrians in the Melbourne Games. Its athletes competed through the games in Munich in 1972. It had its greatest number, 13, at the 1964 Tokyo Games.

After years of conflict, Cambodia rejoined the games in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, fielding five competitors across athletics, swimming and wrestling. This year’s six athletes mark the largest showing since then. It has yet to win a medal in any event.

Cambodian Olympians Vow To Do Their Best (Cambodia news in Khmer)i
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VOA Khmer
02 August 2012
The six Cambodian athletes competing in the Summer Games this year in London say they realize the Olympics are the most competitive in the world, but they promised to do their best in their events. VOA Khmer's Poch Reasey has the interview.
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English with Mani & Mori

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