Thursday, 02 October 2014

Cambodian America

Across the US, Cambodian-Americans Prepare for the Polls

Cambodian-Americans from around the country, and of varying demographics, say they will vote Tuesday.

Neth Monorom, seen here, encourages Cambodian Americans to vote as the number of Cambodian American voters are still low. Neth Monorom, seen here, encourages Cambodian Americans to vote as the number of Cambodian American voters are still low.
x
Neth Monorom, seen here, encourages Cambodian Americans to vote as the number of Cambodian American voters are still low.
Neth Monorom, seen here, encourages Cambodian Americans to vote as the number of Cambodian American voters are still low.
Sok Khemara, Sothearith ImVOA Khmer
WASHINGTON DC - Cambodian-Americans will go to the polls throughout the day Tuesday, to select a president and choose from among a number of local issues and candidates.

US President Barack Obama, a Democrat, and his Republican opponent, Mitt Romney, have been campaigning for months throughout the United States, vying for America’s highest office amid a sluggish economy, deep national divisions on social, health and financial matters and an ongoing, costly war in Afghanistan.

Across the US, a diverse group of Cambodian Americans will take to the polls and have their say in issues that affect them.

Meas Chea, a social worker in Philadelphia, Penn., who left Cambodia 20 years ago, said he will choose a candidate who will better his living standards and maintain peace in the country.

“It is so important for Cambodian-Americans, and Americans in general, because if we wrongly select the leader, this will cause me to spend a lot of money on health care when I am sick,” he said.

He said he was looking for a candidate who would lessen taxes, provide better healthcare and prevent wars and deficits.

Keo Sambath, a dentist in Lowell, Mass., who left Cambodia in 1980, said election participation was crucial, especially in that it can help whole blocs of people.

“When we help them, they will help us,” he said of politicians. “Cambodians in my city, Lowell, have understood this for quite a long time. So one thing that we have to do is vote for whom we like.”

Tan Vibol, who left Phnom Penh in 1979 and is now a resident of Virginia, said the vote for president was an important one, but so is the four-year term.

“If we give him vote and he doesn’t do a good job for what we want and people want, then we have the right to select a new leader four years from now,” he said. “This is important for me.”

Cambodian-Americans from around the country, and of varying demographics, say they will vote Tuesday. Some were voting Democrat, others Republican.

“I am going to vote because I want the country to be better,” said Sam Sokunthea, a law student at Duke University in North Carolina.

“I’m happy to vote as a US citizen,” said Phay Ta, 53 and a first-time voter in the critical election state of Ohio. “I have the right to vote.”
Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Cambodia Foreign Minister UN Speech Touches More on World Issues, Less on Cambodiai
X
29 September 2014
Cambodian Foreign Minister Hor Namhong's speech to the UN’s General Assembly on Monday in New York touches more on world issues and less on Cambodia. Before delivering his speech at UNGA, Hor Namhong told VOA Khmer that Cambodia was now enjoying peace and political stability after the two winning political parties in 2013 election had agreed to work together. His speech comes as Cambodia’s profile on the world stage has expanded in recent years. Cambodia has and improved economy and a growing participation in UN missions around the world. But Hor Namhong’s speech also comes amid deep criticism of Cambodia’s human rights record and a controversial agreement with Australia to help it resettle refuges in exchange for aid money. (VOA Khmer's Pin Sisovann, Washington)

English with Mani & Mori

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Rock the Boat (Movie: 500 Days of Summer)i
X
29 September 2014
You can say, "Things are going really well between the two of you - he's happy and you're happy, so why 'rock the boat'?" What does it mean? Watch here. For more videos - go to www.youtube.com/KhmerSpecialEnglish. To contact Mani & Mori - write to them at maniandmori@gmail.com.
Video

Video Rock the Boat (Movie: 500 Days of Summer)

You can say, "Things are going really well between the two of you - he's happy and you're happy, so why 'rock the boat'?" What does it mean? Watch here. For more videos - go to www.youtube.com/KhmerSpecialEnglish. To contact Mani & Mori - write to them at maniandmori@gmail.com.
Video

Video Get Over It (Movie: Shutter Island)

You can say, "No family is perfect, we argue, we fight. So that fight you had with your cousin last year - 'get over it'." What does it mean? Watch here.
Video

Video Make It Two (Movie: A Walk to Remember)

You can say, "Make it two, please!" What does it mean? Watch here. For more videos - go to www.khmer.voanews.com/maniandmori or www.youtube.com/KhmerSpecialEnglish. To contact Mani & Mori - write to them at maniandmori@gmail.com.
Video

Video Ballpark Figure (Movie: Music and Lyrics)

You can say, "I'm going to throw a pool party this weekend, so can you give me a 'ballpark figure' of how many people are going to come?" What does it mean? Watch here. For more videos - go to youtube.com/KhmerSpecialEnglish. To contact Mani & Mori - write to them at maniandmori@gmail.com.
Video

Video Twist Someone's Arm (Movie: Cinderella Man)

You can say, "Every time I want my sister to clean her room, I always have to 'twist her arm' to get her to do it." What does it mean? Watch here. For more videos - go to youtube.com/KhmerSpecialEnglish. To contact Mani & Mori - write to them at maniandmori@gmail.com.
See more >>>