Saturday, 01 November 2014

Khmer Rouge

A Film by Cambodians About Cambodians Screens in the US

Lost Loves,’ a feature film by Chhay Bora that describes daily life under the Khmer Rouge, screened this weekend at the Palm Springs International Film Festival.Lost Loves,’ a feature film by Chhay Bora that describes daily life under the Khmer Rouge, screened this weekend at the Palm Springs International Film Festival.
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Lost Loves,’ a feature film by Chhay Bora that describes daily life under the Khmer Rouge, screened this weekend at the Palm Springs International Film Festival.
Lost Loves,’ a feature film by Chhay Bora that describes daily life under the Khmer Rouge, screened this weekend at the Palm Springs International Film Festival.
Reasey PochVOA Khmer
WASHINGTON DC - Editor’s note: ‘Lost Loves,’ a feature film by Chhay Bora that describes daily life under the Khmer Rouge, screened this weekend at the Palm Springs International Film Festival. Therese Hayes, who heads the Asia section for the festival, says the film is emotionally powerful—and it is unique because it was created in Cambodia by Cambodians. She spoke to VOA Khmer by phone from the festival, in Palm Springs, Calif.

Why did you choose “Lost Loves” as one of the fifteen films from Asian countries this year?

First of all, the subject matter is of great interest because there is no feature made about the Khmer Rouge. There have been some documentaries but nothing is as personal story as this one. However, I had a very difficult time being able to look at the film because I did not have the contact of the filmmaker, and as you know there are very few films coming out of Cambodia. 

What do you think of “Lost Loves”?

I think it’s a very moving story and the acting was superior to my expectation. But also I like the fact that he made it so personal. And even though it feels like it’s a small story, it has huge impact.  And it’s the kind of film that the audience can resonate with.

This is the first film about what life is really like under the Khmer Rouge. Chhay Bora has shown it around the United States to the Cambodian-American communities. They are very emotional. What about the audience at the Palm Springs International Film Festival? How did they react to it?

‘Lost Loves’ Creator at Work on Trafficking Filmi
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09 January 2013
Cambodian filmmaker Chhay Bora, who debuted in 2010 with “Lost Loves,” has produced a new film that explores the impacts in the country of prostitution and human trafficking. The new film is an attempt to inform Cambodians, especially those in rural areas, about the dangers of sending their daughters to work in Phnom Penh or abroad. “Many people in the rural areas have often been deceived by a small number of people who told them their daughters would work in a restaurant, when in fact they were forced into prostitution,” Chhay Bora told VOA Khmer in a Skype interview. “We want to send them an important message, and that message is that you have to be smart, you have to know who the recruiters really are, where they actually live, and how to contact them,” he said. Families should look for local jobs that may be better than jobs far from home, he said. Another important message of the film is to encourage Cambodians to respect and value the lives of others, and to not purchase young girls at the cost of their future, he said. “We also do not want the world to think of Cambodia as a sex industry,” he said. “We want the world to think that we have a respectful culture and civilization. People should come to visit Cambodia as real tourists, not as sex tourists.” Chhay Bora is currently in the US, attending the Palm Springs International Film Festival to screen “Lost Loves.” ​(Poch Reasey, Washington)

I have seen very few films with that many tears at the end of the film. So many people were so moved that they were somewhat speechless. But also he has more offers of help. People want to know how they can help. That is the first for me. Usually I see people who say, ‘I love the film,’ but that was the end of the story.  Here they really want to support his efforts.

How does this kind of film help victims—it does not have to be Cambodians—but those who are in similar situations?

Probably the exposure is the first step because a lot of people are not aware of what really happened in Cambodia. And as Bora would say, this story is not unique to Cambodia. It has happened in Rwanda, and it’s probably happening right now in Syria. The best we can do is make people aware; you know, we are not politicians but eventually maybe with the media, we can reach more people and help. I wish I had more answers.

Is there anything else you would like to add about “Lost Loves”?

I think this film should be shown at every university. I wish it could find a distribution, but of course it’s not a commercial film, per se. However, I think it’s a film that needs to be given more exposure. So if there’s any way to find other forms of distribution, I am sure that it will be well received and well rewarded.
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Thai Leader on Two-Day Diplomatic Visit to Cambodiai
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30 October 2014
The head of Thailand’s military-controlled government begins a two-day visit to Cambodia today, in a bid to improve diplomatic ties with Cambodia in talks with Prime Minister Hun Sen and other officials. Premier Prayuth Chan-ocha also hopes to improve cooperation along the borders and “clear up controversies of the past,” a spokesman for Hun Sen told reporters Thursday. (Kong Sothanarith, Phnom Penh)

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