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Photo Gallery: Photographer, Nature Lover Seeks to Change Attitudes to Wildlife

In 2000, Suy Senglim met a French journalist who inspired in him a passion for photography. To put this new-found passion to good use, since 2012 he began to capture images of Cambodia’s vast variety of birdlife.
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Usually the species of evergreen habitat emerald dove gets so shy. This photo of the bird is from O'ramis Resort in Mondulkiri province where it is not allowed to disturb those birds including the dove. (Photo by Suy Senglim)
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Usually the species of evergreen habitat emerald dove gets so shy. This photo of the bird is from O'ramis Resort in Mondulkiri province where it is not allowed to disturb those birds including the dove. (Photo by Suy Senglim)

The Great Hornbill is a globally near-threatened resident of hill evergreen and semi-evergreen is a canopy species and a symbol of healthy forest. (Photo by Suy Senglim) 
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The Great Hornbill is a globally near-threatened resident of hill evergreen and semi-evergreen is a canopy species and a symbol of healthy forest. (Photo by Suy Senglim) 

​​The giant Ibis, Cambodia’s national bird, is currently one of the critically endangered species of bird. (Photo by Suy Senglim)
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​​The giant Ibis, Cambodia’s national bird, is currently one of the critically endangered species of bird. (Photo by Suy Senglim)

The Sarus Crane is the tallest flying bird in the world, which migrates from the breeding grounds of dry deciduous forest to foraging grounds of Anlung Pring and Beoung Prek Lpov in Takeo province, small parts in Vietnam close to the border and Ang Tropeang Thmor in Banteay Meanchey. The crane is considered extinct in Thailand. (Photo by Suy Senglim)
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The Sarus Crane is the tallest flying bird in the world, which migrates from the breeding grounds of dry deciduous forest to foraging grounds of Anlung Pring and Beoung Prek Lpov in Takeo province, small parts in Vietnam close to the border and Ang Tropeang Thmor in Banteay Meanchey. The crane is considered extinct in Thailand. (Photo by Suy Senglim)

The endangered peafowl with significant populations only in Cambodia, Vietnam and Myanmar, has declined due to hunting, high demand of live birds, feathers and habitat fragmentation. It also exists in Thailand, Laos, China and Indonesia. (Photo by Suy Senglim)
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The endangered peafowl with significant populations only in Cambodia, Vietnam and Myanmar, has declined due to hunting, high demand of live birds, feathers and habitat fragmentation. It also exists in Thailand, Laos, China and Indonesia. (Photo by Suy Senglim)

The tern has becomes the next extinct species in Cambodia. Action came too late to prevent animals such as the kouprey and the tiger, as well as birds like the Indian Skimmer and Black-bellied Tern, from becoming extinct in Cambodia. This is a lesson that needs to be learned to prevent other species from being wiped out too. (Photo by Suy Senglim)
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The tern has becomes the next extinct species in Cambodia. Action came too late to prevent animals such as the kouprey and the tiger, as well as birds like the Indian Skimmer and Black-bellied Tern, from becoming extinct in Cambodia. This is a lesson that needs to be learned to prevent other species from being wiped out too. (Photo by Suy Senglim)

Alexandrine Parakeet is at risk in Laos, endangered in Thailand and threatened in Cambodia and also under CITES appendix II is absolutely facing the habitat loss of dry deciduous forest and chicks harvested for pets in Cambodia or to be sold in Thailand. (Photo by Suy Senglim)
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Alexandrine Parakeet is at risk in Laos, endangered in Thailand and threatened in Cambodia and also under CITES appendix II is absolutely facing the habitat loss of dry deciduous forest and chicks harvested for pets in Cambodia or to be sold in Thailand. (Photo by Suy Senglim)

A new species to the world of tailorbirds was discovered in 2009 within the territory of Phnom Penh city by leading author Simon Mahood of Wildlife Conservation Society Cambodia. The Cambodian Tailorbird is the second endemic species to Cambodia after Cambodian Laughingthrush. (Photo by Suy Senglim)
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A new species to the world of tailorbirds was discovered in 2009 within the territory of Phnom Penh city by leading author Simon Mahood of Wildlife Conservation Society Cambodia. The Cambodian Tailorbird is the second endemic species to Cambodia after Cambodian Laughingthrush. (Photo by Suy Senglim)

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